In The Saddle (Riding)

  People that aren’t familiar with horseback riding often think of the sport as nothing more than a rider sitting on a large animal that carries them around. If you’ve ridden a horse and couldn’t walk the next day, then you tend to think differently. Core strength is the single most important component of riding safely and maintaining your balance. Balance involves small minute movements of your stomach, back, and pelvic muscles and requires more control and detail than the larger movements of your arms and legs. One way to test your core fitness and balance on your horse is to ride without...
Understanding Ponies By definition, a pony is considered to be any equine that is less than 14.2 hands tall. Ponies come from a variety of breeds, and some pony breeds are actually deviations of regular sized horse breeds. Ponies are capable of everything horses are capable of in terms of riding, driving and competitive events. Ponies are often considered to be the best choice for small adult riders and children because they provide a good physical fit for smaller riders. It can be difficult for a small rider to control a large, heavy horse when their foot barely comes halfway down its girth...
kid on a pony
Horseback riding is an extremely dangerous sport. Many accidents, however, result when the rider fails to understand basic rider safety measures. Whether you ride in the show ring or on the trail, being safety conscious can save your life. Remember Your Skill Level It is remarkably easy for riders to think they are ready to move on to a tougher challenge. In many cases, this is a praiseworthy thing and can make a better rider. However, sometimes it can lead to serious safety issues. Consider your skill level before riding. Ask yourself questions such as; am I educated enough to control this...
Riding Safe
Conditioning is the key to avoiding injuries in the competition arena. If your horse is prime condition, not only are they going to perform better but you’ll also avoid injuries that can come with the stresses of performing. Check with your vet first to make sure your horse is healthy and sound enough to begin a performance conditioning program. Your vet can help you determine what weaknesses your horse may have that may need special consideration. Ask your vet to give you a true assessment of your horse’s condition so that can develop a training routine. Conditioning is not only about...
Horse practice

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